How to Build Drum Speed, Part 4: Bass Drum Speed

When it comes to improving your drum speed, especially bass drum speed, you’re going to have good days and bad days. Be patient as your leg muscles grow and stretch. Keep it mind that the legs and feet have more muscles and larger muscles than the hands and arms.

One thing that I always have to remind my own students is that your feet will never go as fast as your hands. It’s just how we’re built. Before you can develop bass drum speed, it’s good to work on bass drum exercises that help you develop control. A great resource for bass drum exercises is Colin Bailey’s book,
Bass Drum Control (affiliate link).

The Drumming System (affiliate link) says that one of the secrets to bass drum speed is to wear ankle weights while you practice. This well help you develop the muscles in your legs. After a practicing with them, go back and practice without the weights. You will notice results immediately. Another tip for developing bass drum speed is to try playing as loud as you can for a long period of time while wearing ankle weights.

A great exercise is to practice playing singles on your feet heel down and heel up. Playing heel down, you will feel the burn. If you find this boring, put a practice pad on the snare and play along. Years ago, my teacher Chet Doboe, the founder and musical director of the Hip Pickles Drum Band, taught me to practice the samba to develop my foot technique. The samba is great exercise because it allows you to work on controlling two notes in a row.

The Drumming System (affiliate link) recommends Hansenfutz (affiliate link) pedals for training. These are great because you practice in any chair that you are sitting in. You can even them under the desk in your office.

How to Become a Professional Drummer and Find Jobs, Part 3

As a professional drummer, it’s important to completely prepared for performances and rehearsals. In addition to having your music down, you want to have the right tools for the job.

First and foremost, you want to have a good drum set and cymbals. Be sure to invest in cases for your drums. Make sure that you have every single part of your drum kit before you leave. A checklist will help you make sure everything is accounted for.

According to the Drumming System (affiliate link), Here’s a list of some things that you will want to have on you at all times:

Stick Bag

It’s important to have a good stick bag with extra drum sticks. Not only do you have extra sticks, but you can put small tools. Here’s a list of tools you want to keep in your stick bag:

  1. Duct Tape – sometimes things break, such as cymbal stands.
  2. Muffling – Moongel (affiliate link) is great.
  3. Cymbal felts – these get lost in transit sometimes. You might take a cymbal off and the felt goes flying.
  4. Small towel – you sweat.
  5. Pens and pencils – you might need to make notes in your music or take down someone’s phone number.
  6. Business cards – always be ready to promote yourself.
  7. Drum keys – you can never have enough drum keys. Have at least 1,500… just kidding. You get the idea.
  8. Headphones or in-ear monitors – I bring my Vic Firth Isolation Headphones (affiliate link) with me and 1/4 to 1/8 inch adapters.
  9. Rubber bass drum hoop protectors – these can easily dissappear.
  10. Extra wing nuts in a few different tread sizes – make sure you buy the right wing nuts for the brand of hardware you use.
  11. Adjustable wrench – this can be used in place of a drum key and can fix anything!
  12. Extra bass drum pedal springs – if your spring breaks, your bass drum pedal will stop working completely.
  13. Sticks, brushes, and mallets – I personally prefer to keep sticks, hot rods, wire brushes, and cymbal mallets in my bag.

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