Drum Rudiment System 2.0. with Lionel Duperron Review

As a drummer with a rudimental background, rudiments come out in everything that I play. Despite years of marching band, drum corps, private lessons, and practice, applying the rudiments to the drum set is a constant creative challenge for me.

I’ll never forget that rainy day. I decided to stay home all day and watch the entire Drum Rudiment System (affiliate link). One of the great aspects of the this course is that the instructor, Lionel Duperron, constantly reminds you to think critically and do what’s comfortable for you.

The Drum Rudiment System (affiliate link) is a great professional drum course. It covers all 40 international drum rudiments. Everything is slowed down for you in the beginning of the video. The rudiments and exercises are demonstrated at a variety of camera angles. Lionel emphasizes the sequence of each rudiment and how to master it.

I had only two complaints: In my opinion, the course doesn’t go into stick grip and motions to a deep enough level. I also didn’t like is that he didn’t give the name variations of each rudiment.

For a course on how to play drums, I would not recommend this. Parts of it are good if you are learning drums for the first time. A more thorough drum course, such as, Learn and Master Drums with Dan Sherrill (affiliate link) or Mike Michalkow’s Complete Drumming System (affiliate link) would be better for a you, if you are a beginner. The Drum Rudiment System (affiliate link) is a great supplement to either of these drum courses.

As a professional studio drummer, it was a great refresher for me and it showed me some great ideas in regards to how to apply the rudiments to the drum set. I will definitely revisit this course in the future.

It’s more than worth the price for once reason: the sheer quantity of information!

Learn more about the Drum Rudiment System (affiliate link).

 

Rock Drumming System with Jared Falk

After watching the Rock Drumming System (affiliate link) and working out of the workbooks, I was a bit disappointed. It’s not a bad professional drum course, but it pales in comparison to Mike Michalkow’s Complete Drumming System (affiliate link). Ironically, the same company produces both courses.

The course came out many years ago, when video drum lessons were new. In fact, it was the pioneer of DVD drum courses.  It was an excellent course during it’s time. As video drum lessons have evolved and standards became higher, this course has become somewhat obsolete.

At the same time, there are some great things to learn from this course. In my opinion, it’s great for people who just want to focus on rock. The course contains lots of patterns, fills, and tips that any drummer would find useful.

As a drum teacher, I believe in the importance of a solid drumming foundation. If I were starting drums all over again, I’d use a more complete professional drum course, such as Mike Michalkow’s Complete Drumming System (affiliate link) or Learn and Master Drums with Dan Sherrill (affiliate link). Because they go deeper in the the subject of drumming as a whole, I feel that you will get more out of them.

Once you have a solid foundation, this drum course will be great supplement to help you focus on rock. I personally believe that becoming a great rock drummer doesn’t necessarily require a drum teacher (affiliate link). There are so many rock drum books and videos out there that are full of some great information. One of my favorite books is Rockin’ Bass Drum (affiliate link) by Charles Perry. This book taught me a lot (and still does).

If you’re set on this course, I’d say get it, but if you really want a great course that covers a variety of rock styles, check out Mike Michalkow’s Complete Drumming System (affiliate link).

Review of Learn and Master Drums by Dan Sherill

Legacy Learning Systems is the company that produces Learn and Master Drums by Dan Sherrill (affiliate link). This company has an incredible reputation for creating high-quality music instructional courses.

A former student of mine told me that he had ordered this course to brush up on basics and absolutely LOVED it. I ordered a copy the next day.

After watching the videos, reading the workbook, and trying the exercises, I can confidently say that this is a solid drumming course. I really think that Dan Sherrill’s approach will help beginners set and achieve small goals. This is so important at this stage.

The best aspect of Learn & Master Drums (affiliate link) is the workbook. I have never seen a more thorough and detailed book on drumming. The workbook chapters go in order with the DVD chapters. The important stuff is highlighted. This makes learning drums organized, easy, and fun.

I thinkLearn & Master Drums (affiliate link) would have made learning the drums more fun for me. Dan Sherrill does an excellent job of simplifying things. Let’s face it: sitting behind a set of drums can be overwhelming. Dan does a great job of easing you into more challenging material.

I constantly feel the need to refresh myself on the basics and I love the level of in this course. My favorite section of the course was the Moeller Technique section. I found Dan’s demonstrations helpful and the exercises were practical.

No drum course covers everything. There is always more to learn. Despite that, Learn & Master Drums (affiliate link) is an extremely thorough course for beginner and intermediate drummers.

Learn & Master Drums (affiliate link) offers a FREE student online discussion board. You can post questions and answer others questions. This is invaluable because at creates a synergistic learning environment.

At some point the aid of a drum teacher (affiliate link) will be needed to take your drumming to a higher level. I believe that the real time feedback you can get to correct you is something that no video can replace.

Although this course is great, I don’t believe that it’s the best drum course available. The best drum course online is Mike Michalkow’s Complete Drumming System (affiliate link).

Check out this side by side comparison of these two DVD drum courses.

How to Build Drum Speed, Part 4: Bass Drum Speed

When it comes to improving your drum speed, especially bass drum speed, you’re going to have good days and bad days. Be patient as your leg muscles grow and stretch. Keep it mind that the legs and feet have more muscles and larger muscles than the hands and arms.

One thing that I always have to remind my own students is that your feet will never go as fast as your hands. It’s just how we’re built. Before you can develop bass drum speed, it’s good to work on bass drum exercises that help you develop control. A great resource for bass drum exercises is Colin Bailey’s book,
Bass Drum Control (affiliate link).

The Drumming System (affiliate link) says that one of the secrets to bass drum speed is to wear ankle weights while you practice. This well help you develop the muscles in your legs. After a practicing with them, go back and practice without the weights. You will notice results immediately. Another tip for developing bass drum speed is to try playing as loud as you can for a long period of time while wearing ankle weights.

A great exercise is to practice playing singles on your feet heel down and heel up. Playing heel down, you will feel the burn. If you find this boring, put a practice pad on the snare and play along. Years ago, my teacher Chet Doboe, the founder and musical director of the Hip Pickles Drum Band, taught me to practice the samba to develop my foot technique. The samba is great exercise because it allows you to work on controlling two notes in a row.

The Drumming System (affiliate link) recommends Hansenfutz (affiliate link) pedals for training. These are great because you practice in any chair that you are sitting in. You can even them under the desk in your office.

How to Build Drum Speed, Part 3: Hand Speed

According to the Drumming System (affiliate link), a drum pad is only one surface with one feel. It’s a bouncy type feel that’s great for practicing. On the other hand, a drum set has many surfaces with many types of feels. Speed will allow to move your ideas around the drums with much more ease.

  1. Your drums and cymbals should be within easy reach so that you can get to where you need to get really fast. This will constantly change with time, but you want to make as easy as possible.
  2. Practice moving around the kit as fast as you can with a single stroke roll. Do this until your arms are tired. Try to go for five minutes and you will be sweating. Try to keep an eye on where you’re going so you’re not hitting rims. Ask yourself questions, such as  “where am i hitting?” and  “where i am i going?”
  3. At midnight, when everyone is sleeping, air drum AS LOUD AS YOU CAN. This strengthens you wrists. Remember that if you hit your drums you will wake people up. This is a good warm up, too.
  4. Try to play a single stroke roll on you floor tom only holding the middle of the drum stick. Not only does it feel awkward but you have no convincing balance point. Also, practice using the lock grip in the middle of the floor tom. If you have a high pitched floor tom, detune it low (before it loses its tone) so its soggy.
  5. Finally, practice playing double stroke rolls on your floor tom.

The Drumming System (affiliate link) goes into much more depth about how to improve your speed. This is one subject that most drummers from around the world are very interested in. As with everything in drumming and in life, patience and perseverance go a long way.

How to Build Drum Speed, Part 2: Hand Speed

Here are some more tips to get your hands flying around the drums:

  1. Practice on a pillow. Dennis Chambers recommends pillows over practice pads. Dennis has said on many occasions that Buddy Rich used to this to develop wrists, fingers, and forearms. A good pillow will have very little rebound. The purpose of this is that you have to do all the work. Practice single stroke rolls at different volumes, speeds, add aceents, play rudiments, etc. Practicing doubles on a pillow will improve your ability to play doubles on a floor tom. One great thing about pillow practice is that it won’t disturb anyone.
  2. Develop Finger control. This will improve your ability to play really fast grooves. Your wrists have a limit to how fast they can move. French grip gives you the most room for the drum sticks to move around and have the most leverage. The faster you play, the lower the height of your sticks will be. Strengthening each finger individually really helps. Your pinky acts as a stabilizer for the drum stick, but can cramp up. Keep in mind that finger control can be very frustrating to develop.
    Technique Patterns
    (affiliate link) by Gary Chaffee has some great exercises. Also, don’t do finger control exercises on a pillow until you have control on a pad.
  3. Practice the Lock Grip Technique. This technique is practiced by gripping the stick the 2nd joint of the index finger. Some people call this power grip. This really strengthens the wrist and forearms. Despite the name of this technique, it’s important to stay relaxed. This technique is a real hardcore workout for the hands. Try this on a loose floor tom that feels soggy. This will also develop power. There is no rebound in this technique.
  4. Practice new rudiments. Do a certain amount per day. The most important rudiments to work on are single strokes, double strokes, paradiddles, flams, drags, and buzzes. These are sometimes referred to as “The Big 6”, because most other rudiments are built off of these.

How to Build Drum Speed, Part 1: Hand Speed

Building drum speed is one of the top priorities of most drummers in the world. Playing faster is part of the fun in developing yourself as a drummer. Check out an impressive demonstration of hand speed and some great exercises to build it in the Mike Michalkow’s Complete Drumming System (affiliate link).

Here are some tips:

  1. Even out your hands. We all have a stronger hand. Whatever you can do with your strong hand you should be able to do with your weak hand. Keep in mind that the hand that usually plays the hi-hat and ride is getting so much more practice than the hand that plays the snare. Practice open handed playing. Open handed playing usually means that the left hand plays the hi hat (for right handed players). Check out the book The Weaker Side (affiliate link) by Dom Famularo and Stephane Chamberland and The New Breed (affiliate link) by Gary Chester.
  2. Set a goal. For most hand speed goals that you set, the weaker hand is going to need to get stronger. It might be necessary to isolate the weaker hand and work on it. Increase the tempo in small increments. Keep in mind that certain techniques might take months (or years) to improve. Be patient and trust that it will get easier. If you can play 16th notes at 110 on each hand, then you can play 32nd note singles at 220 bpm. I recently set a goal of playing the Moeller technique relaxed with sixteenth notes, at 120 bpm for five minutes straight with each hand.
  3. Practice on drum pads that give very little rebound. Putty practice pads and Moongel Workout Pads (affiliate link) have become popular in the past decade. Mike claims that he put a putty practice pad on the left side of his dashboard and would tap the left stick while driving. Although this is an excellent use of time management, it does not seem to be safe. Don’t drive and drum.

The Top 2 Professional Drum Set Courses on DVD

If you type the words “drum course” or into your favorite search engine, numerous results will come up.

Learn and Master Drums with Dan Sherrill (affiliate link) and
Mike Michalkow’s Complete Drumming System (affiliate link)
are the Top 2 Drum Courses Available.

So which one is the best?

Watch My Video Comparison

Course Comparison Chart

Drum Course Learn and Master Drums
(affiliate link)
The Complete Drumming System
(affiliate link)
Instructor Dan Sherrill Mike Michalkow
Review Read My Complete Review Read My Complete Review
Price $149 $197
Purchase Buy Now (affiliate link) Buy Now (affiliate link)
DVD’s 12 Full Length DVD’s 20 Full Length DVD’s
Play Along CD’s 5 CD’s 15 CD’s
Workbooks 112 Page Workbook 5 Workbooks
Bonuses Online Support Forum Start-Up Resources & Guide
One Handed Drum Roll DVD
Drum Gear Buyers Guide DVD
Members Support Forum
Unlimited Coaching
Level Beginner, Intermediate Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Guarantee 60 Days – Full Refund 90 Days – Full Refund

[Read more…]

Review of Mike Michalkow’s Drumming System, Part 5

To my knowledge, there is one drumming course out their that is similar to the Drumming System (affiliate link). It is called Learn and Master Drums (affiliate link). After trying both courses, I believe that the Drumming System (affiliate link) is a far better product. This course goes into much more detail than
Learn and Master Drums (affiliate link).

Click here to read my review of Learn and Master Drums (affiliate link). I also did a side by side comparison of both DVD drum set courses. Click here to see how the Drumming System (affiliate link) stacks up.

You might be wondering if the course functions well on it’s own, or if you’ll need the guidance of teacher, additional books, or additional videos? If you are good at self-study and want to learn at your own pace, this is an excellent investment. In fact, if you aren’t good at self-study, please don’t buy this course. You will end up frustrated. It requires an incredible amount of discipline.

Keep in mind that it has a money-back guarantee and offers unlimited lifetime support. If you have any follow up questions, they will do their best to help you out. As a plus, the support department has drummers on staff.

At some point the aid of a drum teacher (affiliate link) will be needed to take your drum skills to a higher level.  I believe that the real time feedback you can get to correct you is something that no video can replace.

In terms of the price of the course, you might be wondering if it’s worth it. After going through the entire course, I firmly believe that it’s priced too low. Initially, I was skeptical. I thought that it was going to be an over-priced, over-marketed product. After watching the first DVD, I was impressed and hooked! I sincerely believe that the Drumming System (affiliate link) is worth a lot more than what they are selling it for.

Learn more about Mike Michalkow’s Drumming System (affiliate link).

Review of Mike Michalkow’s Drumming System, Part 4

As a drum teacher, I use the Drumming System (affiliate link) in conjunction with my lessons, but only with certain students. As I’ve said before, it’s not the right tool for everyone. This doesn’t mean that it’s a bad investment. In fact, I believe it was one of the best investments I have made in a drumming educational product.

As a drum teacher, I attempt to cover every aspect of playing the drums in great detail. I also customize the lessons for each student based on their goals and learning style. Regardless, most drum students benefit from supplementary learning material. The beauty of supplementary learning material is that a student might hear or see something I taught them, taught in a different way, and then they master it.  Therefore, with some students, I use the Drumming System (affiliate link) as a supplement to the lessons I teach them.

If I have a student who is very serious about taking their drumming to the highest level possible, I strongly recommend that they purchase it and work with it.  Students who are looking to major in music in college, play drums professionally, and/or teach drums have really benefited from this course. Since the majority of my drum students tend to be hobbyists, I only suggest it if it seemed like a good fit for them. Truthfully, this course is hardcore. If you are currently taking drum lessons, this might a great supplement for you.

On a side note, I gained a great respect for Mike Michalkow as a drummer and a teacher through watching the DVD’s and working out of the books. His approach to teaching drums has given me some fresh ideas for my students.  I was so impressed with him that I’ve actually ordered all of his other courses.

Learn more about Mike Michalkow’s Drumming System (affiliate link).