Drum Rudiment System 2.0. with Lionel Duperron Review

As a drummer with a rudimental background, rudiments come out in everything that I play. Despite years of marching band, drum corps, private lessons, and practice, applying the rudiments to the drum set is a constant creative challenge for me.

I’ll never forget that rainy day. I decided to stay home all day and watch the entire Drum Rudiment System (affiliate link). One of the great aspects of the this course is that the instructor, Lionel Duperron, constantly reminds you to think critically and do what’s comfortable for you.

The Drum Rudiment System (affiliate link) is a great professional drum course. It covers all 40 international drum rudiments. Everything is slowed down for you in the beginning of the video. The rudiments and exercises are demonstrated at a variety of camera angles. Lionel emphasizes the sequence of each rudiment and how to master it.

I had only two complaints: In my opinion, the course doesn’t go into stick grip and motions to a deep enough level. I also didn’t like is that he didn’t give the name variations of each rudiment.

For a course on how to play drums, I would not recommend this. Parts of it are good if you are learning drums for the first time. A more thorough drum course, such as, Learn and Master Drums with Dan Sherrill (affiliate link) or Mike Michalkow’s Complete Drumming System (affiliate link) would be better for a you, if you are a beginner. The Drum Rudiment System (affiliate link) is a great supplement to either of these drum courses.

As a professional studio drummer, it was a great refresher for me and it showed me some great ideas in regards to how to apply the rudiments to the drum set. I will definitely revisit this course in the future.

It’s more than worth the price for once reason: the sheer quantity of information!

Learn more about the Drum Rudiment System (affiliate link).

 

Become a Studio Drummer and Make Money

Many drummers set the goal of becoming full-time studio drummers. It’s very rare that someone has a full-time job as a professional studio drummer these days. Back in the 1970’s drummers, such as John “JR” Robinson, Steve Gadd, and Jim Keltner were busy drumming for television commercials, television soundtracks, movie soundtracks, and top artists. Studio drumming work is still available, but not nearly as much as it was 20 or 30 years ago.

Nowadays, many professional studio drummers, such as myself, do recording sessions with local artists. Making a good sounding recording is very affordable for a singer/songwriter.

Here are some tips that I picked up from the Drumming System (affiliate link) and mistakes I have made:

  1. Live drumming and studio drumming are two completely different animals. With recording, you can listen back to what you did. There is a final product forever.
  2. Unlike live playing, you’re alone in a silent room.The microphones are highly sensitive (even to an air conditioner in the room or garbage truck outside). If other people are with you, it’s important for them to stay quiet when the microphones are on.
  3. Recording sessions can be full of stress and pressure. There is no time to waste in a studio. Most studios charge by the hour.
  4. It’s important for you to relax. You don’t want to sound rigid and tight. Also, you have to be able to comfortably play along with a click track at a variety of tempos.
  5. Be prepared with your music.
  6. Whether or not you have a top of the line drum set, get brand new heads (top and bottom). If not, it will be a waste of time. Tune your heads perfectly to the style you are playing.
  7. Set up your equipment so microphones can be placed on your drums.
  8. Bring extra muffling, tape, extra drum heads, towels, and drum keys.
  9. Bring an extra snare drum or two. You have no clue what your snare drum will sound like in the studio. Many of the top studios have a whole library of snare drums for you to choose from that include wood, steel, brass, copper, and snare drums of different depths.
  10. Strive for perfection, but be patient with yourself.
  11. Cooperate with the engineer. The engineer is trying to get the best possible drum sound.
  12. Have great attitude and give it your best. A job well done in the studio may lead to you getting more live work from the person that hired you.
  13. Know that as time goes on, you will get better and better at studio drumming.

Be sure to read these additional studio drumming tips.